Looking at a decade of drug courts

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U.S. Dept. of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Drug Courts Program Office , Washington, D.C
Drug courts -- United States -- Statistics, Drug abuse and crime -- United States -- Stati
Statementprepared by the Drug Court Clearinghouse and Technical Assistance Project at the American University
ContributionsUnited States. Drug Courts Program Office, American University (Washington, D.C.). Office of Justice Programs Drug Court Clearinghouse and Technical Assistance Project
The Physical Object
Pagination15 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14485699M
OCLC/WorldCa39904223

Looking at a Decade of Drug Courts. NCJ Number. Date Published. June Annotation. This report addresses the background of the drug court "movement," the major areas in which drug courts differ from traditional adjudication processes, and salient achievements to date.

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Agencies. BJA. NCJ Number: Title: Looking at a Decade of Drug Courts: Document: HTML: Date Published: Annotation: This report addresses the background of the drug court "movement," the major areas in which drug courts differ from traditional adjudication processes, and salient achievements to date.

Description: Part I of this book describes the newly emerging problem-solving courts (such as drug treatment courts, domestic violence courts, mental health courts, etc.) and other related approaches to problem-solving judging and judging with an explicit ethic of care.

Authors Winick and Wexler show how judges can use therapeutic jurisprudence not only in specialized problem.

Discretionary Justice: Looking Inside a Juvenile Drug Court By Leslie Paik Rutgers University Press, Read preview Overview Treatment with Teeth: A Judge Explains Why Drug Courts That Mandate and Supervise Treatment Are an Effective Middle Ground to Help Addicts Stay Clean and Reduce Crime By Anderson, Peter The American Prospect, Vol.

Drug Courts. New York: Routledge, COPY. Drug courts offer offenders an intensive court-based treatment program as an alternative to the normal adjudication process.

Begun inthey have since spread dramatically throughout the United by: National Drug Court Institute Douglas B. Marlowe, J.D., Ph.D.

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Chief of Science, Policy & Law, National Association of Drug Court Professionals Judge William Meyer (Ret.) Senior Judicial Fellow National Drug Court Institute Judge Jeffrey Tauber (Ret.) President Emeritus, National Association of Drug Court Professionals Director, Reentry Court.

drug court evaluations have produced definitive information on juveniles. Most juvenile drug court teams are still explor­ ing whether their mission should be pre­ vention or intervention.

Proper assessment and treatment of offenders is primarily the responsibility of service providers, but all drug court. Literature indicates that drug courts produce lower recidivism rates, increased retention rates, and lower costs than traditional criminal justice case processing.

As drug courts approach their second decade, there is a void in the literature regarding factors that influence the success of drug court. Drug courts are specialized court dockets, or parts of judges’ calendars of cases awaiting action in court, that generally focus on cases involving nonviolent offenders with substance-abuse problems.1 Drug court programs generally include intensive court supervision, drug testing, and.

Marcelle has been an editor in the legal field for over a decade, editing countless documents with great attention to detail. With a passion of looking for laughter in all of life’s experiences, she used this focus to find gems of humor hidden within the mundane.

This book is a collection of those s:   A Decade of Drug Treatment Court Research. This article explores the decade of drug treatment court research conducted at RAND.

Jan 1, Journal Article. Journal Article. Drug Courts, a Bridge Between Criminal Justice and Health Services. There is striking overlap between the public health threats of drug abuse and crime.

Drug Courts: Equivocal Evidence on a Popular Intervention explores what the UN and other multilateral bodies say about drug courts, reviews the drug court experience in the United States and around the world, and examines other ways to avert incarceration for minor drug offenses.

Research indicates that the allocation of resources to a drug court should be based on demonstrated benefit and that drug courts should estimate their costs using figures such as the average cost of incarceration. The studies included in this report were limited by a lack of accessible data on many aspects of drug court operations.

Drug court success depends heavily on implementing the drug court model with fidelity and adhering to widely recognized best practices, in particular, following the “Ten Key Components” of drug court success. This study assesses drug court procedures and practices through the eyes of those who were actively participating in it.

About this report --Overview of drug courts --Target populations, participant attributes, and program outcomes: the Clark County experience --Judge's role in drug court participants' success --Treatment issues in the drug court setting --Drug court intervention for juveniles --Cost-benefit analysis of a mature drug court.

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Series Title: NIJ report. Drug Courts in Operation: Current Research provides an in-depth look at an increasingly utilized approach to rehabilitating substance abusers.

Drug courts offer their participants a chance to better themselves by providing support and structure to those that do not have it in their life, offering substance abusers a chance to participate in.

About this report --Overview of drug courts --Target populations, participant attributes, and program outcomes: the Clark County experience --Judge's role in drug court participants' success --Treatment issues in the drug court setting --Drug court intervention for juveniles --Cost-benefit analysis of a mature drug court.

Series Title. Drug courts help participants recover from addiction and prevent future criminal activity while also reducing the burden and costs of repeatedly processing low‐level, non‐violent offenders through the Nation’s courts, jails, and prisons.

Drug court programs have a tangible effect on criminal recidivism. Page 6 - Violations of laws prohibiting or regulating the possession, use, distribution, or manufacture of illegal drugs Offenses in which a drug's pharmacologic effects contribute; offenses motivated by the user's need for money to support continued use; and offenses connected to drug distribution itself Drug use and crime are common aspects of a deviant lifestyle.

crowded dockets. An example of such a program is drug treatment court (DTC), the most popular and widely adopted specialized drug court model in the United States (Cooper & Trotter, ).

In their various forms, drug courts have been distinguished by several features, such as. If looking at recidivism, it depends if the metric is looking solely at drug charges, any arrests, or persistence models (length of time before arrest).

As a whole, the risk of being rearrested for a drug-crime for individuals from drug courts was lower than a comparison group. Since its evaluation of the first drug court (the Miami-Dade County Felony Drug Court), NIJ has sponsored research examining drug court processes, outcomes and costs.

A recent example is the year study of the Multnomah County drug court in Portland, Oregon. Read the evaluation of the Multnomah County drug court in Portland, Oregon (pdf, pages). Drug court teams are typically led by a judge and include a prosecutor, defense counsel, treatment provider, probation officers, law enforcement and court coordinator who work together to support and monitor a participant's recovery.

They maintain a critical balance of authority, supervision, support and encouragement. Drug courts help participants recover from use disorder with the aim of reducing future criminal activity.

As an alternative to incarceration, drug courts reduce the burden and costs of repeatedly processing low‐level, non‐violent offenders through the nation's courts, jails, and prisons while providing offenders an opportunity to receive treatment and education.

Drug courts essentially offer a choice to defendants whose alleged crimes are deemed to have been the result of a substance use disorder: Take.

National Drug Court Institute Review, Vol. III, 2 3 INTRODUCTION n little more than a decade, drug courts have become a standard feature of the judicial landscape in this country. Every state has at least one, and some, such as New York and California, have dozens.

The rapid proliferation of drug. Inthe first drug court launched in Miami-Dade County, Florida, laying the foundation for what is now more than three decades of justice system reform. Treatment courts prove that providing supervision, structure and evidence-based treatment was a far more successful approach to substance use and mental health disorders than incarceration.

Based on the demonstrated success of drug courts—and the enthusiastic public attention these courts have generated—a number of states have begun to take the next step, seeking not just to replicate pilot drug courts, but rather to test system-wide the viability of new approaches to the problem of addiction.

Perhaps no criminal justice innovation has spread as rapidly in recent years as. The number of cases of children entering the foster care system due to parental drug use has more than doubled sinceaccording to research published this week in JAMA Pediatrics.

Usually, those interested in drug courts look at the results — they do help people a lot more than jail does — and do not inquire too deeply into how they work. Murphy’s study provides the first realistic and critical look at how and why drug courts attempt to manipulate their clients, how clients adjust to these efforts, and what.

Here is a look at some of the most famous drug addiction cases from the past 50 years. Kurt Cobain. The lead singer of the world’s biggest rock band of the ’s was also a lifelong heroin addict. Sadly, his drug problem only worsened as his fame grew.

Unable to handle the pressures that come with success, Cobain secluded himself in his.This article focuses on adult Drug Treatment Courts and discusses 1) the genesis and implementation of first-generation specialized drug courts, 2) the concept of therapeutic jurisprudence and the theoretical underpinnings of DTCs, and 3) the rise in drug courts nationwide and their impact on rearrest and treatment retention.Drug court success stories reduce the cycle of addiction, crime.

When Eau Claire, Wis., Circuit Court Judge Lisa Stark placed Rick in drug court, jail personnel called him a "frequent flyer" because he had racked up 33 criminal convictions for which he had served cumulative jail time of four years.

"Rick is 46 years old," said Judge Stark.